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OAHI ready to work with MGCS on Putting Consumers First Act

November 7,2016

 - The Ontario Association of Home Inspectors is looking forward to working with the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services on its Putting Consumers First Act.

On Nov. 3 The Hon. Marie-France Lalonde, Minister of Government and Consumer Services (MGCS), along with MPPs Hang Dong, and Yvan Baker announced the province’s intention of continuing with Home Inspector Licensing under Bill 59, the Putting Consumers First Act. OAHI’s president Murray Parish attended the Nov. 3 announcement.

OAHI will continue to promote the high level of education and professional standards as it has since 1994, as it waits for the Provincial government to establish ‘minimum’ standards for Home Inspector Licensing. Bill 59’s first reading was carried Nov. 3; second reading is scheduled for Nov. 14.

“Homebuyers are welcome to visit www.oahi.com to see the extensive, mandatory and ongoing training OAHI member inspectors must pursue to maintain their standing in the association. OAHI will also continue to advocate for well-educated, professional home inspectors in Ontario,” says Murray Parish, RHI and president of the Ontario Association of Home Inspectors.

“We reiterate that OAHI supports the establishment of common competency requirements for home inspectors to operate in Ontario. Licensing offers a reasonable way of permitting an individual to begin offering home inspection services to the public with the assurance of that basic competency being in place. However, it is a permit, not a designation earned through advanced training and experience. We hope to have a positive and pragmatic discussion of OAHI's ongoing role in helping to regulate home inspection professionals in Ontario,” adds Parish.

About OAHI

Through education and advocacy, the Ontario Association of Home Inspectors cultivates a thriving home inspection industry based on the highest standards of professional development and ethical standards. In doing so, OAHI cultivates the ‘gold standard’ for home inspectors in Ontario. OAHI is the only provincially recognized body of home inspectors by The Ontario Association of Home Inspectors Act, 1994 (Bill PR158). OAHI is a not-for-profit association, and the largest home inspection association in Ontario.


New Elements at the 2017 OAHI/CAHPI-ON Education Conference

November 12,2016

New Elements at the 2017 OAHI/CAHPI-ON Education Conference

Education is the Key

Members from all home inspection associations, home inspection students and practicing home inspectors at all levels are welcome at the 2017 OAHI/CAHPI-ON Education Conference March 3 to 5, 2017 in Burlington.

Tim Hudak, CEO of the Ontario Real Estate Association, is scheduled to be the keynote speaker. OREA recommends OAHI and its members in its homebuyers’ handbook.

Education is the Key is the theme, and with the upcoming home inspector licensing under Bill 59, continuing your education is even more important to reinforce the industry’s integrity and professionalism. Speaking of Bill 59, there will be a general discussion and Q&A on the Putting Consumers First Act.

Sixteen education sessions are planned, and new for 2017, we will indicate which courses are geared toward new home inspectors (basic/intermediate) and for more experienced home inspectors (advanced).

The new Mentorship Cafe will give delegates a chance to interact one-on-one with more experienced home inspectors. If you’d like to be a mentor, contact Andrew Dixon: [email protected]

OAHI’s AGM will be held on Saturday March 4.

New exhibitors have already confirmed their participation in the conference. To be an exhibitor, contact Tim Chase: [email protected]

The OAHI/CAHPI-ON Education Conference will be held at the Holiday Inn Burlington Hotel & Conference Centre. Registration is now open. Click here: full conference fees are the same as 2016.

Watch the OAHI website, Facebook, Linkedin and YouTube pages for updates.

Your Home Inspection: What to Expect

DECEMBER 5, 2016

House Systems Inspected by OAHI Members Complete Inspection Standards can be found at www.oahi.com.

A typical inspection last 2 to 3 hours, plus additional time for report writing.

Includes a visual assessment of hundreds of house components, and the condition at the time of inspection.

For best results the inspection should be completed during daylight hours.

A full paper or digital report will be delivered within a set timeframe.

Home Inspectors do not move furniture, equipment or storage.

Your home inspector CANNOT provide:

Opinion on market value

‘Pass” or “Fail” grade

Purchase recommendation

Repair services on defects

Assessment of any component that is concealed, inoperable, inaccessible unsafe to inspect.

OAHI member inspectors see homes differently!

Why Get a Home Inspection If You’re Buying “As Is”?

by Mark Cohen, J.D., LL.M., InterNACHI General Counsel, and

Nick Gromicko, InterNACHI Founder

January 27, 2017

Click below to view article:

https://www.nachi.org/as-is.htm

Electrical Safety

February 27, 2017

Click below to view article:

https://www.nachi.org/electric.htm

10 Easy Ways to Save Money & Energy in Your Home

March 20, 2017

by Nick Gromicko, Ben Gromicko, and Kenton Shepard 

City considers options for Heritage Theatre redevelopment

Staff says 17 developers have expressed interest in revamping defunct site

Jan 30, 2018

by Peter Criscione/Brampton Guardian

RBC launches data sharing for app developers 

Mar 20, 2018

By The Canadian Press

Brampton talent comes together to tackle the urban future

By MICHAEL LEWISBusiness Reporter

Mon., March 26, 2018

Toronto’s housing bubble cost sellers $136 million: Report

By TESS KALINOWSKI-Real Estate Reporter

Thu., April 12, 2018